A Word on That Prosecco Row

Since the turn of the new year, the wine industry has turned its attention to the well-priced and popular fizz Prosecco, and in particular a row that is ‘bubbling’ between the producers of the wine in its native Italy and those that who are selling it here in the UK. Producers are unhappy that the wine is being sold on tap in the UK’s on-trade.

A problem of definition

 Prosecco must come from a bottle (source: Wikipedia)
Prosecco must come from a bottle (source: Wikipedia)

The problem relates to the definition of the wine – the wine that is sold in barrel and served via a tap is the same as bottled Prosecco, but according to legislation there must be a clear distinction between the two in terms of how they must be labelled and presented to the consumer. There are strict EU laws dictating how sparkling wines must be sold, and producers are angered that these are being ignored by those serving the wine on tap. By definition, the wine they are selling cannot be called Prosecco, because Prosecco must come from a bottle. Continue reading

A successor to Robert Parker

Robert Parker
Robert Parker

Whether we approve or disapprove of the power Robert Parker wields over the fine wine market, particularly in Bordeaux, we can’t deny that his scores remain highly influential. Parker’s initial scores have historically had an impact on wine futures, and in the last few years our attention has been drawn to the consequences of a favourable Parker re-score.

The power of the re-score

The biggest winner this year was Chateau Montrose, whose 2003 and 2010 vintages were re-tasted by Parker in 2014 and both received an elevated score. It’s clear that Parker is a fan of Montrose, and his evaluation during a vertical tasting pushed the score of the 2003 from 97+ to 99 and the 2010 crept up a single point to achieve a perfect 100/100. Of course, the market jumped on this wine, deemed by Parker to be flawless, and merchants reported an extraordinarily rapid flurry of sales. Continue reading