Wines for spring – try something different!

If springtime is usually when you start phasing out red and drinking more white, then make this the year that you think outside the box and try something different. Today we’re looking at some creative suggestions for springtime drinks that might just surprise you.

Try new beverages and think outside the box
Try new beverages and think outside the box

Dry Sherry

If your only experience of Sherry is a glass of Bristol Cream on Christmas day, it’s time to think again as there is far more to this complex drink than the cream style that was largely developed for the British market. The Spaniards know that there is nothing more delightful to sip in the sunshine than a chilled Fino or Manzanilla sherry alongside some of their local cuisine. Forget everything you thought you knew about Sherry and give it a try – great with tapas, soup or salad. Continue reading

Whites for the cellar

Riesling Grapes
Riesling Grapes (source: Wikipedia)

When we talk about wine investment we seldom mention white wines, and least of all dry whites – it is true that dessert wines can age majestically but their dry counterparts are not known to age particularly well. This is largely due to the fact that red wines are high in tannins, which help them to age, and white wines have significantly less tannin. However there are a few exceptions among dry whites that deserve a bit of time in the cellar in order to fully reach their potential.

The best white Burgundy

The best Chardonnay in the world comes from Burgundy and while the grape is not known for wines destined for the cellar, the sheer complexity of the top white Burgundies can take a few years to emerge. The best wines from top producers will benefit from cellaring in order to become rich, deep, and complex. Continue reading

Making wine in a city, a war zone, and a desert

LDN CRU Mixed Dozen
LDN CRU (photo from official site)

Wine writer Jamie Goode recently reported on the first vintage of London Cru, the first ever UK-based ‘urban winery’. You might think a city center is an unusual place for a winery, and you would be right! Unsurprisingly, the grapes are not grown in London, but rather sourced from several well-known European wine-making regions such as Languedoc-Roussillon and Piedmont. However all of the vinification is done in London, and it will be very interesting to taste these wines. London is not the only unlikely place where wine is made though – so today we’re looking at some of the other more unusual locations around the world where wine is made against the odds. Continue reading