Meet the little device that could change the way we drink fine wine

Meet the little device that could change the way we drink fine wine

For the past 12 months the wine industry has been intrigued by a new device known as the Coravin, which you may have heard of if you read the wine press regularly. This clever device allows us to draw wine out of the bottle without removing the cork, thereby allowing the consumer to enjoy a glass while leaving the remaining wine preserved as it was before for future consumption.

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The ugly truth about wine fraud

If you are new to wine investment, you might feel slightly uneasy about the recent high profile cases of alleged wine fraud, such as the recent press articles surrounding a fellow named Rudy Kurniawan. Increasingly the industry is becoming distrustful of collections that seem to appear from nowhere without explanation, and experts don’t like to think that they have been deceived about the contents of the bottle – it makes a mockery of the fine wine industry.

Wine Collection‘The Billionaire’s Vinegar’

Kurniawan’s case is certainly not the first to make investors nervous – Benjamin Wallace’s book ‘The Billionaire’s Vinegar’ depicts the story of Hardy Rodenstock, a German collector that is thought to have not just duped the wealthy collectors that purchased bottles from him but also expert wine tasters. With all the uneasiness that comes with cases of fraud, how concerned should the everyday investor be that they might fall victim?

Investing in wine involves a considerable financial commitment and the sensible investor will want to get it right from the start, so with any luck, the concept of ‘bottle provenance’ won’t be new to them. Provenance is the traceable history of the bottle and its contents. It ought to show that the bottle can be traced all the way from the winery in which it was made to its current location, and all the while it ought to have been cellared securely, and in optimal conditions of humidity, light, temperature and away from harmful vibrations, in order for it to be in good condition to drink when the time comes. This isn’t as complicated as it sounds, any decent wine cellarage facility will be able to provide evidence of the proper care of the wines cellared there including their secure transportation to and from other facilities as the wine changes hands.

Stumbling across a collection of wine

What we’ve lost though is the romantic notion of stumbling across a collection of amazing wines – anyone that has tasted wines from Kurniawan’s or Rodenstock’s collection will be forever taunted by the possibility that the ‘fine wines’ they were drinking were in fact nothing of the sort. It is reported that there is a substantial black market for empty bottles of First Growth Bordeaux wines, which has led to them being ritually smashed after tastings and even in restaurants in China to ensure they are not recycled for wine fraud.

Should the investor be worried? Well, if you work with an ethical wine investment business, you’ll be in good hands, as they know the risks to them as well as to you of dealing in bottles whose history can’t be traced. With all eyes on Kurniawan’s case and the film version of ‘The Billionaire’s Vinegar’ in development, frankly it isn’t a risk worth taking. But you should still be prudent, and keep provenance at the centre of your thoughts – don’t be taken in by collections of wine that seem to appear from nowhere, as all may not be what it seems.